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Archive for October, 2015

We have been working with several Local Nature Partnerships over the last year or so in two specific areas:

  1. to identify the value of the natural environment in social, environmental and economic terms;and
  2. to make the case to businesses and other organisations for investment in the natural environment within their area.

This natural capital analysis fits with the objective of the Local Nature Partnerships which is to make sure that the value of the natural environment, and the value of the services it provides to the economy and the people who live there, is taken into account in local decisions, for example about planning and development.

This fits within the National Planning Policy Framework which outlines the requirements on local authorities to conserve natural capital. Section 11 of the framework relates to “Conserving and enhancing the natural environment”. This acts as a de facto ‘national guideline’ on how/when the planning system should operate in the context of accounting for natural capital.

In terms of more specific guidelines as to how to value natural capital, there is government guidance for policy and decision makers on using an ecosystems approach and valuing ecosystem services, including:

  1. a) Defra (2015) What nature can do for you. A practical introduction to making the most of natural services, assets and resources in policy and decision making
  2. b) Defra (2007) An introductory guide to valuing ecosystem services
  3. c) Other sources on valuing natural capital (ecosystem services)

In terms of Government requirements on local authorities for the natural environment beyond the NPPF:

  • The Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 requires all public bodies to consider biodiversity conservation;
  • Some habitats and species are protected under the Habitats Directive through the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 in England; the Birds Directive, through the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010, and the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended); and
  • The Town and Country Planning Regulations 2011 require an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) to be undertaken in which impacts on natural capital will need to be assessed (Schedule 2 of the Regulations sets out ‘exclusion thresholds’ below which EIA does not need to be considered).

While there is no statutory requirement on local authorities to account for the natural environment in a particular way, the above guidance makes it clear that the natural environment should be given consideration. And the guidance available, including those outlined above, illustrate that there is no lack of available methods.

Our work is trying to make it easier for LNPs and local authorities to use these methods in practice. For some examples of this to date, see our case study write-ups. More will follow soon!

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